Inside WordPress.com

Yesterday morning, I needed to peel myself off my chair in disbelief when I received one particular e-mail: its the WordPress.com Golden Ticket. This barely month-old blogging service is apparentl giving out one of the hottest web invites to get since Gmail.

Thing is, why bother using a hosted WordPress service when I already run WP itself on my own hosting account? After choosing from the 8 un-editable default templates, setting up categories and pages, you’re really left with nothing else to do, but post. This takes away the need for the never-ending chore of editing the look of your blog, and the endless installation and upgrading of every WP plugin available. It lets you focus on what is essential: your content.

As for the setup itself, it just feels like you were given a lower user level inside WP. Aside from the feature-rich enhanced posting mode, which needs some getting used to for someone used to typing ‘< 's and '>‘s, there really isn’t much of a difference from a WordPress installation you did yourself, since the system uses WordPress Multiuser, or WordPress MU.

More insights:

  1. There’s a set 25MB upload limit, which I find reasonable, though the 300MB photo storage available for every BlogSpot account is still noteworthy.
  2. Everytime you make successful edits, the confirmation text boxes provides a really nice cooling down effect turning from a hot yellow color, to light blue. Makes you want to flash that geek smile everytime.
  3. On your Dashboard, you’ll be able to see the latest entries from other WordPress.com users. Lo and behold, I got my first comment a couple of seconds after I posted my second entry. Reminiscent of my Livejournal days.
  4. But how and where do I put my ads, you ask? I can’t see any easy way to have ads display on the blog, unless you’d want to insert your code with each post.

More info here: What can you do with wordpress.com.

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  • You can probably put your ads directly in the post content, but the point of WordPressMU blogs is not to help you make money, but as you said, it’s all about the content. 😉

    And it’s about the community, which is a neat part of the MU sites.

    Reality is that MU hosts will probably add their own ads in the future so they can make money while you blog for free. So far, that’s not happening with wordpress.com.

  • kim

    rain, asan na invite ko sa wordpress.com? hehehe

  • currently, wordpress.com doesn’t allow custimzation of the template, like blogger.com does. i am sure WP.com will soon. if so, i plan to place to counter at the blog.

  • You don’t get a counter, which is always a bit of unreliable information, but in wordpress.com you do get access to your referrers, in the referer panel, a better indicator of popularity and page ranking than a visitor counter. If you really want a counter of visitors, then send a note through feedback to request one of the host.

  • Lorelle: Hey, thanks for commenting, and welcome to our blog 🙂 ‘So far, that’s not happening with wordpress.com’… and hopefully, it will stay that way. Counter vs. referrer? It does look like its wiser to just consider the referrers.

    Richard: Thanks for reading, and welcome to you, too!

    Kim: Asa ka pa! :p

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