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Philippine-outsourcing is NOT ‘wicked’

Just so we can set things straight for our foreign visitors: NOT all outsourcing companies in the Philippines are like Wicked Innovations who was called by a UK company a “scam”. The Philippines is still one of the best outsource locations.

Elwin of Inq7.net was trying to get in touch with WickedInnovations (according to his column). I think, if the owners of this company is somewhere in cyberspace, they need to come out and clean their name.

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  • “outsourcing” – – what is that?

  • Personally, I’m apalled by that. Filipinos are some of the hardest working individuals in the planet. I personally ensure our clients that we only deliver the best quality work to them.

  • techieguru

    My experiences led me to conclude that Filipinos are lazy and incompetent. Filipinos do not have that perfectionist mindset. Tries to get the most amount or money for the least amount of work and gives very mediocre results. Promises a lot at the beginning of the project and ultimately fails to deliver 9 times out of 10. Cannot be trusted.

  • “I think, if the owners of this company is somewhere in cyberspace, they need to come out and clean their name.”

    Trust me dude, they won’t haha 😉

  • robin

    Hi just a simple question if i was to start up a new business in the philippines what sort would you recomend as a new venture

  • This is just a response to techieguru’s comment post. Nobody is perfect, including us Filipinos. There are some people out there who will take advantage of various ‘clients’ and just reap away big bucks..still many others still strive to really work hard to achieve success.

    By the way Techieguru…you must be from another outsourcing country giving a bad rep to us Filipinos…

    All I really wanna say is…Go to hell asshole!!!

  • Anbu Ganesh

    Sorry to differ TechieGuru, May be you have bunch of unmovtivated, unprofessional resources. Time to relook at the recruitment, Compensation (Salary) policies. I could find similar resources in any part of the world. I have worked in Philippines and I have had an excellent experience. I am so impressed with the folks and culture that I still read inquirer online 🙂 and am very much in touch with the technology updates that are happening in that region. Thanks to Pinoy Tech Blog.

    Back to the so called scam allegation – Rarely this happens in some of the outsourced destinations. It is unfair to generalise.

    Hope this helps,

  • jefferson faudan

    Reading this article makes me think… wanting me to post one of the speeches written by a girl who made it in London. But anyway, it’s funny however that we hear a lot of ranting when Filipinos do some shitty things… Funny they never make an issue out of some other asian countries and if they do, they’d be dead after several weeks. I think practically, after all these years that lots and lots of Filipinos have been migrating abroad as laborers has proven SO MUCH of how poverty can make people work their asses for a BETTER LIVING. So I think it would be unfair to put in generalization some mistakes done by a few countrymen (if there were, which by the way have been mistakenly pressed due to some irresponsible reports made by some irresponsible writers).

    With regards to the person who commented on Filipinos who cannot be trusted? well… nevermind… it would make me sound more of a racist… but rather let this winning speech speak for itself by Patricia Evangelista. A 19-year-old, Mass Communications sophomore of University of the Philippines (UP)-Diliman, did the country proud Friday night by besting 59 other student contestants from 37 countries in the 2004 International Public Speaking competition conducted by the English Speaking Union (ESU) in London.

    She triumphed over a field of exactly 60 speakers from all over the English-speaking world, including the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, reported Maranan.

    The board of judges decision was unanimous, according to contest chairman Brian Hanharan of the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC).

    BLONDE AND BLUE EYES

    When I was little, I wanted what many Filipino
    children all over the country wanted. I wanted to be
    blond, blue-eyed, and white.

    I thought — if I just wished hard enough and was
    good enough, I’d wake upon Christmas morning
    with snow outside my window and freckles across
    my nose!

    More than four centuries under western domination
    does that to you. I have sixteen cousins. In a couple
    of years, there will just be five of us left in the
    Philippines, the rest will have gone abroad in
    search of “greener pastures.” It’s not just an
    anomaly; it’s a trend; the Filipino diaspora. Today,
    about eight million Filipinos are scattered around
    the world.

    There are those who disapprove of Filipinos who
    choose to leave. I used to. Maybe this is a natural
    reaction of someone who was left behind, smiling
    for family pictures that get emptier with each
    succeeding year. Desertion, I called it. My country
    is a land that has perpetually fought for the
    freedom to be itself. Our heroes offered their lives
    in the struggle against the Spanish, the Japanese,
    the Americans. To pack up and deny that identity is
    tantamount to spitting on that sacrifice.

    Or is it? I don’t think so, not anymore. True, there
    is no denying this phenomenon, aided by the fact
    that what was once the other side of the world is
    now a twelve-hour plane ride away. But this is a
    borderless world, where no individual can claim to
    be purely from where he is now. My mother is of
    Chinese descent, my father is a quarter Spanish,
    and I call myself a pure Filipino-a hybrid of sorts
    resulting from a combination of cultures.

    Each square mile anywhere in the world is made
    up of people of different ethnicities, with national
    identities and individual personalities. because of
    this, each square mile is already a microcosm of
    the world. In as much as this blessed spot that is
    England is the world, so is my neighborhood back
    home.

    Seen this way! , the Filipino Diaspora, or any sort
    of dispersal of populations, is not as ominous as so
    many claim. It must be understood. I come from a
    Third World country, one that is still trying mightily
    to get back on its feet after many years of
    dictatorship. But we shall make it, given more time.
    Especially now, when we have thousands of eager
    young minds who graduate from college every
    year. They have skills. They need jobs. We cannot
    absorb them all.

    A borderless world presents a bigger opportunity,
    yet one that is not so much abandonment but an
    extension of identity . Even as we take, we give
    back. We are the 40,000 skilled nurses who
    support the UK’s National Health Service. We are
    the quarter-of-a-million seafarers manning most of
    the world’s commercial ships. We are your
    software engineers in Ireland, your construction
    workers in the Middle East, your doctors and
    caregivers in North America, and, your musical
    artists in London’s West End.

    Nationalism isn’t bound by time or place. People
    from other nations migrate to create new nations,
    yet still remain essentially who they are. British
    society is itself an example of a multi-cultural
    nation, a melting pot of races, religions, arts and
    cultures. We are, indeed, in a borderless world!

    Leaving sometimes isn’t a matter of choice. It’s
    coming back that is. The Hobbits of the shire
    travelled all over Middle-Earth, but they chose to
    come home, richer in every sense of the word. We
    call people like these balikbayans or
    the ‘returnees’ — those who followed their dream,
    yet choose to return and share their mature talents
    and good fortune.

    In a few years, I may take advantage of whatever
    opportunities come my way. But I will come home.
    A borderless world doesn’t preclude the idea of a
    home. I’m a Filipino, and I’ll always be one. It isn’t
    about just geography; it isn’t about boundaries. It’s
    about giving back to the country that shaped me.

    And that’s going to be more important to me than
    seeing snow outside my windows on a bright
    Christmas morning.

    Mabuhay and Thank you.

  • jefferson faudan

    Reading this article makes me think… wanting me to post one of the speeches written by a girl who made it in London. But anyway, it’s funny however that we hear a lot of ranting when Filipinos do some shitty things… Funny they never make an issue out of some other asian countries and if they do, they’d be dead after several weeks. I think practically, after all these years that lots and lots of Filipinos have been migrating abroad as laborers has proven SO MUCH of how poverty can make people work their asses for a BETTER LIVING. So I think it would be unfair to put in generalization some mistakes done by a few countrymen (if there were, which by the way have been mistakenly pressed due to some irresponsible reports made by some irresponsible writers).

    With regards to the person who commented on Filipinos who cannot be trusted? well… nevermind… it would make me sound more of a racist… but rather let this winning speech speak for itself by Patricia Evangelista.

    BLONDE AND BLUE EYES

    When I was little, I wanted what many Filipino
    children all over the country wanted. I wanted to be
    blond, blue-eyed, and white.

    I thought — if I just wished hard enough and was
    good enough, I’d wake upon Christmas morning
    with snow outside my window and freckles across
    my nose!

    More than four centuries under western domination
    does that to you. I have sixteen cousins. In a couple
    of years, there will just be five of us left in the
    Philippines, the rest will have gone abroad in
    search of “greener pastures.” It’s not just an
    anomaly; it’s a trend; the Filipino diaspora. Today,
    about eight million Filipinos are scattered around
    the world.

    There are those who disapprove of Filipinos who
    choose to leave. I used to. Maybe this is a natural
    reaction of someone who was left behind, smiling
    for family pictures that get emptier with each
    succeeding year. Desertion, I called it. My country
    is a land that has perpetually fought for the
    freedom to be itself. Our heroes offered their lives
    in the struggle against the Spanish, the Japanese,
    the Americans. To pack up and deny that identity is
    tantamount to spitting on that sacrifice.

    Or is it? I don’t think so, not anymore. True, there
    is no denying this phenomenon, aided by the fact
    that what was once the other side of the world is
    now a twelve-hour plane ride away. But this is a
    borderless world, where no individual can claim to
    be purely from where he is now. My mother is of
    Chinese descent, my father is a quarter Spanish,
    and I call myself a pure Filipino-a hybrid of sorts
    resulting from a combination of cultures.

    Each square mile anywhere in the world is made
    up of people of different ethnicities, with national
    identities and individual personalities. because of
    this, each square mile is already a microcosm of
    the world. In as much as this blessed spot that is
    England is the world, so is my neighborhood back
    home.

    Seen this way! , the Filipino Diaspora, or any sort
    of dispersal of populations, is not as ominous as so
    many claim. It must be understood. I come from a
    Third World country, one that is still trying mightily
    to get back on its feet after many years of
    dictatorship. But we shall make it, given more time.
    Especially now, when we have thousands of eager
    young minds who graduate from college every
    year. They have skills. They need jobs. We cannot
    absorb them all.

    A borderless world presents a bigger opportunity,
    yet one that is not so much abandonment but an
    extension of identity . Even as we take, we give
    back. We are the 40,000 skilled nurses who
    support the UK’s National Health Service. We are
    the quarter-of-a-million seafarers manning most of
    the world’s commercial ships. We are your
    software engineers in Ireland, your construction
    workers in the Middle East, your doctors and
    caregivers in North America, and, your musical
    artists in London’s West End.

    Nationalism isn’t bound by time or place. People
    from other nations migrate to create new nations,
    yet still remain essentially who they are. British
    society is itself an example of a multi-cultural
    nation, a melting pot of races, religions, arts and
    cultures. We are, indeed, in a borderless world!

    Leaving sometimes isn’t a matter of choice. It’s
    coming back that is. The Hobbits of the shire
    travelled all over Middle-Earth, but they chose to
    come home, richer in every sense of the word. We
    call people like these balikbayans or
    the ‘returnees’ — those who followed their dream,
    yet choose to return and share their mature talents
    and good fortune.

    In a few years, I may take advantage of whatever
    opportunities come my way. But I will come home.
    A borderless world doesn’t preclude the idea of a
    home. I’m a Filipino, and I’ll always be one. It isn’t
    about just geography; it isn’t about boundaries. It’s
    about giving back to the country that shaped me.

    And that’s going to be more important to me than
    seeing snow outside my windows on a bright
    Christmas morning.

    Mabuhay and Thank you.

  • jefferson faudan

    Reading this article makes me think… wanting me to post one of the speeches written by a girl who made it in London. But anyway, it’s funny however that we hear a lot of ranting when Filipinos do some shitty things… Funny they never make an issue out of some other asian countries and if they do, they’d be dead after several weeks. I think practically, after all these years that lots and lots of Filipinos have been migrating abroad as laborers has proven SO MUCH of how poverty can make people work their asses for a BETTER LIVING. So I think it would be unfair to put in generalization some mistakes done by a few countrymen (if there were, which by the way have been mistakenly pressed due to some irresponsible reports made by some irresponsible writers).

    With regards to the person who commented on Filipinos who cannot be trusted? well… nevermind… it would make me sound more of a racist… NEVERMIND

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  • Philippines is still one of the best destination for outsourcing projects. Although there may be some that gives negative impression to foreign clients but I would say that most of the people working in the outsourcing business can still be trusted and can produce results.

    Here are the some of the reasons why outsourcing to the Philippines is still the best option.

    http://outsourcing-seo.blogspot.com/2008/01/seo-philippines-why-outsource-in.html

  • henrylow

    Influence can be defined as the power exerted over the minds and behavior of others. A power that can affect, persuade and cause changes to someone or something. In order to influence people, you first need to discover what is already influencing them. What makes them tick? What do they care about? We need some leverage to work with when we’re trying to change how people think and behave.

    http://www.onlineuniversalwork.com

  • Even though there are lots of articles that are coming into the webs that discriminating the Filipino capabilities, we can’t still deny that the Philippines is still the number one in terms of outsourcing.

  • Indeed Filipinos can deliver high-quality services at a lower price. This is the reason why outsourcing companies choose to build their businesses in the Philippines.

  • It seems that my response to the flames by “techieguru” (wee bit obvious name, don’t you think?) is 4 years late. But nonetheless, outsourcing to the Philippines is still a low-cost option to companies that delivers top of the line results.

    It seems that “techieguru” got unlucky with the people he chose or didn’t do an extensive research on who to outsource the task to. Whatever his story is, if what he said was true then their shouldn’t be this much outsourcing companies in the Philippines today. 🙂

  • foreigners discriminates the capabilities of Filipinos even thoug there are lots of them hired Filipinos to do their work. Philippines is still the best in outsourcing because Filipinos are hardworking and they can produce a high-quality.

  • One of the worst mentality of Filipinos is that when we hear something negative about another person, we immediately assume that it’s true.We immediately bite on the issue just because it’s “something” and assume the issue is true since a Filipino is being involved.

  • It would be there loss if they judge all outsourcing companies in the Philippines as scam. For I believe Filipinos are very hardworking and have good quality work. Philippines is competitive and no longer under the shadow of India… 🙂

  • That is the mentality of Filipinos, they think negatively that they hear something negative about another thing or person, we automatically conclude that it’s true.We immediately bite on the issue and make some bad stories about it.

  • I absolutely agree… Philippines is now one of the leading outsource service providers in Asia. Filipinos are very competitive in this industry.

  • hate outsourcing tech

    I wish HP didn’t outsource tech support to the Philippines. You have to deal with a language barrier and individuals reading off of a script without the ability to answer questions that go off the script. If I buy a product in the US, I want to receive my tech support here as well.

    • Matt Spencer

      Thats not cool man HP is smart for outsourcing here The Philippines is a smart country and their English is awesome! The Philippines culture is similar to USA and they are getting better and better at English but i do see your point 🙂

      • Laura Gibbs

        Hiring service providers or outsourcing IT companies also lets you skip the worries on technical issues that affect the company’s infrastructure. A reliable, topnotch third party or service provider will do the worrying and solving for you.

  • Outsourcing in the Philippines still remain the best.

  • Even with all the criticisms and controversy from other countries, outsourcing in the Philippines is still a booming business and many are hoping that it would grow bigger over the next years.

  • The literacy rate in the Philippines is about 90% with basic education available to most of the population. Compared to India, business process outsourcing firms in the Philippines don’t have much problem when it comes to finding and keeping highly skilled workers for their clients. Filipino workers are not just highly skilled but also very dedicated and hard working.